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Librarians to the Rescue: Using School and Local Libraries for all Your Pop-Culture Needs: Manga and Anime

Denver Comic Con Panel Presentation by Tabatha Farney, Emilie Vrbancic, Joel Tonyan, Benjamin Syn, and Christi Piper.

Awesome Anime and Manga Titles

Age Ratings

Let’s face it, not all manga and anime are appropriate for all ages. Just like movies and video games, manga and anime have age ratings available.

Anime Age Rating

Anime age ratings can follow the film ratings of the Motion Picture Association of America or the TV Parental Guidelines set by the Federal Communications Commission, but anime publishers may have their own age ratings as well. Here are some common ratings you may find:

  • TV-Y7
  • TEEN
  • TV-PG
  • 13+
  • 15+
  • TV-14
  • 16+
  • 17+
  • TV-MA
  • 18+

Manga Age Rating

Each publisher has their own age rating system, so definitely check with the publisher. However, most manga publishers will group their age ratings like following (but may not use this exact language):

  • All Ages/Everyone
  • Teen (10+ or 13+)
  • Older Teen (16+)
  • Mature (18+)

For the Teachers: Incorporating Manga and Anime into the Classroom

Motivate and Engage Students

Anime and manga are more than entertainment--they can make learning fun and get students motivated to learn outside the textbook. Teaching a class on World War II? Show the human element regular Japanese people experience with a screening of Grave of the Fireflies (1988).

Visual Learner

Manga Guide to Statistics coverAnime and manga visualize concepts and ideas in a medium that is easily accessible to students. Manga Guide to Statistics anyone?

Instant Cultural Studies

Anime and manga reflect Japanese popular culture and cultural norms.

Language Learning

Trying to teach Japanese? Use anime to introduce speaking Japanese and manga for reading Japanese. Don't have time in the classroom? Encourage it outside the classroom. It's a great way to reinforce language learning.

For the Libraries: Building Your Manga and Anime Collections

Traditional Sources

You know those reference sources and buying guides for libraries...

Anime Review Sites

This is just a few, but there is a ton out there.

The Award Winners

With limited resources, you'll want to collect the best of the best. So start by looking at the award winning anime movies and series.

A Few Natural Recommendations

Let's face it--there are a few titles all libraries should have. Not a comprehensive list, but a starting place for libraries starting to collect anime.

  • Anything by Studio Ghibli: This group released several major anime films including Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away. Although Hayao Miyazaki retired in 2014, this group still exists.
  • Lots by Madhouse, Inc.: Another anime studio that created popular films like The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and Summer Wars, but also produced classic and current TV series.

Traditional Sources

You know those reference sources and buying guides for libraries...

Manga Review Sites

This is just a few, but there is a ton out there.

The Award Winners

With limited resources, you'll want to collect the best of the best. So start by looking at the award winning manga.